Seven Links 9/28/19 Traci Kenworth

woman asleep in book, dreaming

Seven Links 9/28/19

Traci Kenworth

Writing:

1. https://killzoneblog.com/2019/09/dont-be-afraid-to-go-there-in-your-writing.html “I’m a fan of the AMC series Mad Men, which I’ve been re-watching. So smartly written and superbly acted, and its attention to detail in the setting—1960s New York ad world—is fantastic.

Among the many episodes and scenes that have stayed with me, the one that stands out is from the first season—Episode 9, “Shoot” (written by Chris Provenzano and series creator Matthew Weiner ). The title is a play on words, for in the episode there’s a photo shoot, and at the end another kind of shoot, which I’ll get to in a moment.

In this one, Betty Draper—perfectly played by the incandescent January Jones—is given a (seemingly) out-of-nowhere offer to become the new face of Coca-Cola. She had done some modeling before marrying Don Draper and taking on the duties of a full-time housewife.

Betty is flattered and excited. It’s a chance to break out of the routine she’s in, to escape some of the mundane problems she has to deal with at home. One of those problems is a neighbor who raises pigeons. The man chewed out Betty’s kids for letting their dog attack one of his free-flying birds. He threatens to shoot the dog if it happens again.

Now Betty has this opportunity! An exec at McCann-Erickson, one of the big agencies, calls her into a studio for a photographic session.”

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Research & Some Fun Bits:

1. https://www.booksandsuch.com/blog/reading-groups-why-love-them/ “Writers, for the most part, are readers. And that means they have two reasons to feel fondness for reading groups: as a grand place to connect with fellow readers and discuss a book; as an author who knows connecting with reading groups can be a fabulous way to gain new fans. In this post, let’s explore reading groups and why we love them.

We Love Reading Groups Because We’re Readers

I’ve belonged to the same book club for about 15 years. The club itself celebrated its 25th anniversary two years ago, when we all (12 of us) trekked to Monterey, Calif., to tour everything John Steinbeck (his birth place in nearby Salinas and his Monterey haunts). We read his The Red Pony for our book that month and discussed it as we dined at a restaurant in a historic Monterey building that weekend.

I love our reading group because we’re eclectic. Karen likes feel-good books; Susan likes a more literary read; Tom hungers for any nonfiction historical; Beth appreciates books–either fiction or nonfiction–that inform our view of other countries or other times in history, etc.

Pretty much each month when we gather together, someone will remark, “I never would have read this book if it hadn’t been picked by the club, but I really liked it…” Or, “I only finished reading this book because the club picked it. I didn’t like it because…”

2. https://zojestage.blogspot.com/2019/09/pitch-wars-advice-blog-hop.html “For those of you who are about to be selected for Pitch Wars – and for those of you who are not – I see REVISIONS in your future!

Revising is something all writers do, whether it’s your first book or your hundredth. “How do I make my book better?” can be a maddening question and there aren’t always easy answers. However, there are common things that you can look for as you approach the next draft of your novel. I’m in the process of developing a workshop to help writers identify issues that many of us encounter, and these fall under two headings – Strengthening the Story, and Perfecting the Writing.”

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Some Things More Serious:

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Teaser Fiction & Poetry:

1. https://colleenchesebro.com/2019/09/24/re-post-colleens-2019-weekly-tanka-tuesday-poetry-challenge-no-146-synonymsonly/

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Book Reviews, Cover Reveals, & Author Interviews:

1. http://www.fantasyliterature.com/reviews/all-the-bad-apples/ “On her seventeenth birthday, Dublin teenager Deena Rys accidentally comes out as gay to her father; he doesn’t react well. Later that day, she confides in her older sister, Mandy, who is also appalled — not because she’s gay, per se, but because she’s been researching the family history and has come to a frightening conclusion. Mandy believes there’s a curse on all the Rys women who don’t fit in, and that something terrible happens to all of these “bad apples” at the age of seventeen.

The next morning Mandy is seen jumping from a cliff on the far side of the country.

No body is found, but the note Mandy left for Deena sure looks like a suicide note, and the family presumes her dead. Everyone except Deena, that is, who steadfastly believes her sister is still alive, a belief that is bolstered when she finds another note from Mandy. In the envelope with the note is a story, part of the Rys family history, and it leads Deena to another location where the next piece of the narrative will be found.

This begins a trek across Ireland, during which Deena learns more about the Rys history and sees the places where important events unfolded. She is joined eventually by her best friend, Finn, and two girls whose identity is best left unspoiled for now. (Being from the US, I had to mentally recalibrate my ideas about distances and remind myself that yes, it’s plausible that a teenager could get all the way across Ireland in a few hours by train. We’re not talking New York to California here.) At each site, there’s a note from Mandy, with more of the story. Time is running out, though. Not only are the teens’ excuses for being gone from home starting to wear thin, but Deena is seeing signs of the banshees that herald the curse.”

2. http://www.fantasyliterature.com/reviews/the-wicked-king/The Wicked King (2019) is the second book in Holly Black’s THE FOLK OF THE AIR series. The first book, The Cruel Prince, and a supplementary novella, The Lost Sisters, introduced us to Jude and Taryn, mortal twin sisters who were brought to faerie after their parents were murdered by Madoc, a former general in the Court of Elfhame who is now raising the twins as his own daughters. You need to read The Cruel Prince and, if you’d like some additional background, The Lost Sisters, before reading The Wicked King. This review will have some spoilers for the story up to this point.

At the end of The Cruel Prince (here’s where spoilers for that book start!) Jude pulled a fast one on Madoc and all the fae. She arranged for Cardan, the cruel prince of the title, to be crowned king so that she could protect her little brother, Oak, from that fate. But because she had trapped Cardan into vowing obedience to her for a year and a day, Jude is actually calling the shots behind the scenes. Nobody knows this except Cardan and Jude.”

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5 thoughts on “Seven Links 9/28/19 Traci Kenworth

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